Posts Tagged ‘‘Fatea Review’’

Acoustic Spectrum 3 Radio stations 1 TV station

January 28th, 2013

Acoustic Spectrum is a new MULTI radio and television station creating valuable exposure for musicians seeking additional exposure using both forms of media.

3 Radio stations, 1 TV station

Acoustic Spectrum logo

Acoustic spectrum radio is specifically designed to cater to unsigned or signed artists with small labels to showcase and promote their particular style of music. Artists will be given opportunities for free publicity across Acoustic Spectrum’s listeners and of course Fatea Magazines supporters

Follow Acoustic spectrum on twitter @acousticspectru and @Fatea_magazine and Acoustic Spectrum on Facebook

Acoustic Spectrum TV is great exposure for all the newest indie and alternative featured videos streamed 24/7.

 

 

I recorded the song ‘Ballad of an Ordinary Man’ for the Fatea Showcase Session Download Spring 12 – ‘Walking’ which went live on February 1st 2012.

Our good friend and fellow music-lover, Neil King is one of the creators of Acoustic Spectrum, has been involved in the Indie music scene for over 20 years, bringing the first published music magazine for the indie market and 20 years on still producing the magazine and showcasing new artists from all over the world!

Check out FATEA Magazine for reviews, releases, Live and much more.

 

I’ve had some very well written reviews from FATEA; they really listen!!

by Pete Christie

Pete Christie – Black, White, and 50 Shades of Grey – Review by FATEA

August 30th, 2012

Review of Pete Christie’s performance on the Fire Stage at the Purbeck Folk Festival 2012 by Neil King Editor of FATEA Magazine.

 Pete Christie on the Fire Stage at Purbeck Folk Festival 2012 by Neil King, Editor FATEA Magazine

Next up is on the Fire Stage is Pete Christie. Pete is a singer songwriter that I’ve long admired. He’s got the common touch in terms of his song writing. His songs portray an attitude of dogged determination and have plenty of character.

Some of his material definitely falls into the protest singer category, but others also have a far more personal touch, symbolising an individual’s inner struggle and their relationships with people and society around them offering a counterpoint to songs coming more about society.

 

Pete always gives off the vibe of a musician totally absorbed in what they are doing on stage, coming out of it to talk to the audience between songs. He plays his songs very much live, meaning that even the songs of his you think you’re familiar with may well throw you on the day. It’s also a set that sits on the cusp between night and day and that’s a good metaphor for the performance, the clarity of daylight dwindles and the uncertainty of the night begins to take hold. Issues aren’t black and white, events tend to be impacted by what’s in the shadows and Pete’s songs reflect that well.

 

This is a performance to savour, one to take onboard and definitely one to experience, Purbeck Folk festival has chosen it’s acts well.

 

 

 

FATEA offer a number of Services News & Features Reviews Releases Live Gig & Festival guide and acoustic spectrum radio show.

 

 

FATEA review by Neil King | Pete Christie @ The Bricklayers Arms, Poole | nostalgia for a listening audience

January 9th, 2012

Pete Christie

Review: words and pictures Neil King, FATEA

Venue: The Bricklayers Arms
Town: Poole
Date: 6th January
Website: http://www.petechristie.co.uk/

It was a nostalgia ridden first gig of 2012, the first gig in what had been a stalwart venue of the music scene, The Bricklayer’s Arms, affectionately known to all, simply, as The Brickies, in some twenty odd years.

 

Back in the old days, the music used to be held in a hall out of the back. The toilets used to be outside and the smokers were inside. The hall has been demolished, the music now inside the main pub in a refurbished back bar, the toilets are now inside the pubs and the smokers are found outside.

Back then there were three pubs within a stone’s throw that did music, now there’s none. Tonight is a one off to celebrate the birthday of Harry, one of the bar staff. We do have a new music venue in the area, the wonderful Mr Kyps, but the days of doing a tour of Ashley Cross or even playing all three venues on the one night have long since gone, torpedoed by residents associations and anti-entertainment legislation.

 

One thing that is consistent is tonight’s performer, Pete Christie, he played The Brickies back in the heyday when if you wanted to get a fresh pint and it was raining, you got wet and whilst there was a certain amount of nostalgic longing in the pre-gig chatting, there was also a grudging gratitude for being in a warm and comfortable room, particularly as it was a party and there was food available.

 

Pete Christie is a singer/songwriter with a common touch, he has a knack for extracting a song from areas where other singer/songwriters fear to tread. It’s relatively easy to write songs around emotional events or the big political issues, more difficult to write about the more mundane, more difficult still to write about it in a way that holds the attention of the listener, Pete, has that talent.

 

He’s playing a long set which gives him the opportunity to test out new songs projected to appear on an album that Pete is going to be releasing this year. These are judiciously mixed with more familiar songs from his extensive repertoire, including a number of requests shouted from the audience, some of which are no longer included on his current set list.

 

 

Blues and singer/songwriter classics from the likes of early Fleetwood Mac also form part of the set as Pete seems to absorb himself in the music, just him and his guitar, being played in a number of different styles, including, briefly, as a lap guitar. Pete showcases himself not only as a man of words and melodies but also a consummate performer on the old six string.

 

The room isn’t as conducive to music as the old hall was, it’s part of a corridor for both the toilets and one of the smoking areas, fortunately Pete’s an old trooper when it comes to these sort of distractions and not detract from a highly enjoyable performance.

 

There was a sense of nostalgia about being back in the Brickies, but that really was eclipsed by the enjoyment of spending the time in the company of and listening to Pete Christie.

 

 Review: words and pictures Neil King, FATEA

****

PETE CHRiSTiE & DJ CONNiE @ THE BRiCKiES!

 

A free Birthday Bash for ‘Harry’ aka Chris, Bar Manager at The Bricklayers Arms, Poole

 

featuring singer-songwriter-guitarist Pete Christie performing live acoustic anglicana folk n roots

 

PLUS Solid Air/Larmer Tree resident Conrad Barr DJing before/after from 8pm till late, Fri 6th Jan, 2012

 

DJ Connie is workig on rcording a 6-disc lifetime archive box-set, due for launch late 2012…watch out for this amazing collection.

 

Fatea review – Master of Anglicana – Pete Christie album ‘Frank’

November 13th, 2011

 

 

Review

Pete Christie
Album: Frank
Label: Self Released
Tracks: 9
Website: http://www.petechristie.co.uk

When I was off on a trip recently I got talking about singer/songwriters and one name that came up was Dorset singer/songwriter, Pete Christie. Not long afterwards a contact through Facebook came up with the same name. It had been a while since I’d seen Pete perform live and it just seemed right to get out “Frank”, his most recent album and spend some time in his company.

Then came the big surprise, I didn’t actually have a copy of “Frank” which means that my knowledge of the works of Pete Christie come through his live performances and the occasional radio show that I’ve caught him on are what’s implanted his songs in my head, not a bad feat when you hear as much as I do.

So I felt it time to remedy that situation, so Pete, here’s a belated review of “Frank” I hope it’s served you well.

 

Pretty much every time I’ve seen Pete perform it’s just been him and a guitar, occasionally with a bass player in tow, so I wasn’t really expecting a band album. Having got over that shock it was time to give the album a really good listen.

The first thing you notice is the songs, without an iota of doubt it’s the poetry and music that highlight Pete as an outstanding writer. It’s the ability to hold your attention when singing about the everyday that separate the good from the great. It’s turning those observations into words and melodies that capture the imagination where genius lies.

 

Joining Pete on the album are a host of Dorset performers, including Frankie Milner, Aimee Newsome-Stone and Monique Houraghan, who have performed Pete’s songs over the years. Hearing the songs like this shows just how well they’ve been written, how they can sound so different and still impact you the same.

 

As Eric Morcombe famously said about notes, ‘I’m getting all the right notes, not necessarily in the right order.’ It’s the same with words, it’s not just what Pete says in his songs, it’s how he says it and more importantly what he doesn’t say.

 

“Frank” can mean straight forward and honest, not holding back. That sums up the album oh yes and the poetry and the melody. This is an album of songs that matter. Pete Christie is a master of Anglicana.

 

FRANK album cover

Neil King